While working with Dr. Nguyen from boltz.ai, one of the first groups in the world using quantum computing to help increase the crop yields of farmers, I got to know a roadmap of how Dr. Nguyen and his team plan on applying quantum computing to agriculture in the coming years.

Within the next 5 years, Dr. Nguyen and boltz.ai will use quantum annealers to solve problems that will improve:

  1. Wild fisheries management, productivity and environmental performance of aquaculture
  2. Reforest agricultural lands with little intensification potential
  3. Link productivity gains with protection of natural ecosystems
  4. Plant existing cropland more frequently, improve soil…


Just recently, boltz.ai published a graphic outlining their use case for quantum computers in agriculture on their website. In it, Dr. Quang Nguyen and his team outline the problem: different crops require different resources and nutrients in order to maximise their crop yields. Their solution? To create a system “that helps farmers apply the right crop input sources at the right rate, the right time, and in the right place.”

The team has done this by optimizing water and crop inputs with certain constraints. First, the land is divided into different blocks which each have different nutrient requirements. Second, each…


The current machine learning utilizes software in order to process and store information. The energy usage of this process is extremely inefficient, however, leading to questions of how this process could be sped up.

Recently, researchers physicists at Radboud University were able to speed up this process through the usage of hardware instead of software. Through their research, they discovered that they could create a network of cobalt atoms on black phosphorus, creating a material which processes information much faster and much more efficiently than machine learning. …


The quantum computing world continues to display its advantages as quantum computers are applied to more and more areas. Just recently, researchers were able to apply quantum computing to a real world logistics optimization problem which required assigning aircraft to certain routes. The quantum computer, which only had 2 qubits, was able to complete the task, demonstrating that even small quantum computers can be used in the real world.

During the study, the Chalmers research team used a Quantum Approximate Optimization Algorithm (QAOA) in order to complete the task. A QAOA is a type of algorithm that can be used…


As the quantum world continues to expand and advance, it seems that more and more people are catching onto quantum computing. Just this fall, IBM had released their quantum roadmap for the next couple of years, with plans of having 1,121 qubits by the year of 2023. However, it is estimated that quantum computers will not see widespread use for at least a decade. So, what happens to quantum during this decade?

Quantum computers will not just be under development, but also in use across the next decade. Our current quantum computers can still be used for specific cases, and…


Accepted into the Qubit x Qubit quantum computing course and two weeks into the lectures, we learned about quantum computing in the abstract, and how quantum gates affect qubits. I think it’s important to talk about why applying two hadamard gates to a qubit returns the qubit back to its initial state.

The reason why this occurrence with 2 hadamard gates occurs is because a quantum gate is applied to each individual state separately, or in parallel. …


Ok — here goes! In this blog post, I will be explaining a part of chapter 9 of Quantum Computing as a High School Module, the Deutsch Jozsa Algorithm.

Quantum algorithms require the usage of quantum gates, so it is natural to move to simple quantum algorithms after learning about quantum gates. Quantum algorithms are just algorithms that are made for quantum computers that do the job of classical systems better. The more notable algorithms, like Shor’s Algorithm, are actually applicable in the real world. …


I used the Cirq programming language to program entanglement after understanding chapter 7, “Entanglement” of Quantum Computing as a High School Module.

After working a little with single qubit gates, I moved on to multiple qubits gates, mainly the CNOT Gate, which I learned from the course, entangles two qubits together. Entanglement is where if the measure of one qubit is known, then the measure of other qubits can instantly be known, even if you do not actually measure the qubit. The CNOT Gate has a control qubit and a target qubit. If the control qubit is 0, then the…


I used the Cirq programming language to program single qubit gates after understanding chapter 6, “Quantum Gates” of Quantum Computing as a High School Module.

While doing this, I was able to create a quantum circuit that implemented the X Gate, and Hadamard Gate using Cirq language. In this blog post, I will explain the functions of the Hadamard Gate, and the X Gate and how to program them using Cirq.

Qubits have two definite states, 0 or 1, as well as a superposition state. In superposition, qubits are neither 0 nor 1, but instead they are both. The superposition…


On Monday, July 20th, I had the great honor of talking to Dr. Allard De Wit from Wageningen University, one of the main contributors of the WOFOST crop model. WOFOST is one of the best crop models being used to measure crop yields around the world. You can read more in my blog post, Why Crop Modeling? I got the opportunity to ask him some questions about WOFOST, as well as crop modeling in general.

Probably the biggest thing I learned from our conversation was that one of the main obstacles that blocks crop modeling from moving forwards is the…

Richard Wang

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